Prevent as a response to all forms of extremism 24 4.1.3. This can hinder their social development and educational attainment alongside posing a very real risk that they could support or partake in an act of violence. 2).We expected therefore to encounter widespread opposition to the Duty among school and college staff, particularly in the context of confidential research interviews and an anonymous survey. Prevent as safeguarding 23 4.1.2. School Management Support Analyse School Performance (ASP) AnyComms Plus. not just schools) must have regard. Prevent within Schools. The reference to citizenship is significant, because - as far as we are aware - it is the first time since the new citizenship curriculum was published that the Government has actually encouraged schools to use it. PDF | This chapter explores the ways that context shapes the enactment of the Prevent Duty in secondary schools. Joel Busher. It’s not just violent extremism that staff need to be aware of. Terrorism and education PREVENT duty in Schools Trojan horse and education Teacher duty of care British Values in Education Prevent duty in Further Education Open Access . Implementation of the Prevent duty in schools and colleges 13 2.4. The Prevent duty forms part of schools’ and childcare providers’ wider safeguarding duties. AnyComms Plus Access for your school; AnyComms Plus v16 upgrade ; Assessment Data Statutory Collections; Attendance codes; Buckinghamshire education standards report; Common Transfer File (CTF) Early Education Funding for 3 and 4 year olds; FFT Aspire; Foundation Stage eProfiles; Free school meals. Although the Prevent duty is crucial, it won’t weigh heavily if time isn't given for effective professional development on the issue. The Prevent duty forms one part of the UK’s overarching strategy to reduce the threat from terrorism. School address : Lancashire Prevent in Education Group . ‘As an ordinary Leeds lass who spent two decades embroiled in … 4. Prevent Duty and Promoting Fundamental British Values. The Prevent duty forms one part of the UK’s overarching strategy to reduce the threat from terrorism. An updated version has been drafted and is available to view online but this has not yet been officially adopted. Editors and affiliations. Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales: This is general guidance to which all public bodies who are subject to the Prevent Duty (i.e. In order to protect children in your care, you must be alert to any reason for concern in the child’s life at home or elsewhere. What critics of Prevent fail to recognise is that the Prevent strategy actually aims to promote free speech as crucial to the safeguarding duty, maintaining that “schools should be safe spaces in which children and young people can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and the extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology”. Free school … The Prevent Duty: Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers, June 2015 3. • Prevent Duty – Statue Law in July 2015 • Prevent is part the NHS Standard Contract • Prevent sits across both Adult and Children Safeguarding • Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on certain bodies, in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. Home secretary Theresa May, a strong supporter of tougher rules to prevent Islamic extremism in schools. How the Prevent duty has been playing out on the ground: What we know so far 15 3. The Prevent duty does not require early years providers, teachers or other staff to carry out unnecessary intrusion into family life, but as with any other safeguarding risk, you must take action if you observe behaviour that concerns you. The Prevent duty: what it means for schools and childcare providers In order for schools and childcare providers to fulfil the Prevent duty, it is essential that staff are able to identify children who may be vulnerable to radicalisation, and know what to do when they are identified. What is this? 1; Lee Jerome. This round up of existing advice and guidance may help in the planning of professional development for your school. The Prevent Duty does not give school staff any new powers or functions. Policy: From the 1st July 2015 all schools, registered early years childcare providers are subject to a duty under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism” This duty is known as the Prevent Duty. Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales Schools must: promote community cohesion; and ensure that fundamental British values are promoted in the delivery of the curriculum and extra-curricular activities and reflected in the general conduct of the school. From 1 July 2015 all schools are subject to a duty under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. Findings 23 4.1. Prevent and schools - the role of schools Why is Prevent relevant for schools. Teachers are already expected to identify safeguarding concerns in relation to pupils at their school. However, some researchers have shown that adapting one’s school policies does not necessarily translate into altered practices and behaviour. This page sets out the Scottish approach to safeguarding and protecting the wellbeing of vulnerable young people from the influence of people promoting violent extremism and terrorism. It is essential that all staff are up to date with their requirements under the Prevent duty and are able to recognise and respond to signs of radicalisation. Children and young people can be exposed to extremist ideology. It is part of the National Counter Terrorism Strategy known as CONTEST. the Prevent duty. Prevent duty guidance. This is a duty on all schools and registered early years providers to have due regard to preventing people being drawn into terrorism. Hounslow Council has a Statutory Duty to protect vulnerable children: "The Prevent Duty in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 on specificed authorities, in the excercise of their functions, to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism." Slides by Ofsted on the Prevent Duty for schools can be viewed here 3. It is essential that all staff are up to date with their requirements under the Prevent duty and are able to recognise and respond to signs of radicalisation. The evidence suggests that the interpretation of the Prevent duty within the framework of safeguarding renders it more recognisable for schools, without necessarily raising these political and ethical concerns. The Prevent duty became law back in 2015. In March 2015, the UK government issued guidance on the ‘Prevent duty’ to help people from being drawn into terrorism. It’s split into four modules which look at the relevant legislation, links to policies and procedures, what the values actually mean and how they can be made relevant to young children. It was first published in March 2015. How does the Prevent Duty help children? NDNA’s Prevent Duty and Fundamental British Values is a concise online course covering all main aspects of this key topic. 2; 1. The Prevent duty, introduced as part of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, requires schools, further education colleges and other ‘specified authorities’ (including universities and health and social services) to show ‘due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. Schools can build resilience by ^providing a safe environment for debating controversial issues and helping them to understand how they can influence and participate in decision-making…Citizenship helps to provide pupils with the knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. But while many schools (academies and free schools) are exempt from the national curriculum, they are not exempt from the Prevent Duty. The Prevent Duty simply places emphasis on the need to prevent pupils from falling under the influence of extremist ideas and integrate this into the school’s ongoing safeguarding role and syllabus. The government recently revised its statutory Prevent duty guidance for schools. The aim of ‘Prevent’ is to stop people becoming or supporting terrorists and to do this by challenging ideologies, protecting vulnerable individuals and supporting institutions, such as schools. – The Prevent Duty: Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers, June 2015 – Slides by Ofsted on the Prevent Duty for schools can be viewed here – The Educate Against Hate website carries extensive information and practical advice for teachers and school leaders about protecting children from radicalisation and extremism. The Prevent strategy aims to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism. In 2015, the UK Government placed a duty on specified authorities (including schools, colleges and universities) to have, in the exercise of their functions, “due regard to the need to prevent … While it remains rare for children and young people to become involved in terrorist activity, young people from an early age can be exposed to terrorist and extremist influences or prejudiced views. The Educate Against Hate website carries extensive information and practical advice for teachers and school leaders about protecting children from radicalisation and extremism. Methods 17 4. Prevent is one strand of this strategy, and sits alongside Pursue, Protect and Prepare. Tags: Citizenship. Since the Prevent Duty was first discussed in Parliament, it had been the focus of extensive and often highly critical debate (Chap. Schools. Prevent duty guidance. Non-violent extremism, where extremism but not violence is promoted, is also an area that comes under the Prevent duty. The Prevent duty came into force in the UK in 2015, placing a legal responsibility on schools and teachers to implement anti‐terrorist legislation and prevent young people from being drawn into extremism or radicalisation. School settings need ‘to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation to promote fundamental British values’. Prevent in Schools Why is Prevent in schools important? This is for school leaders, teachers, practitioners and partners. Prevent and ‘Fundamental British Values’ 26 4.1.4. As previously mentioned, a list of the specified authorities can be found in schedule 6 of the 2015 act, and each of the organisations included in this list should demonstrate compliance to Prevent duty. Schools in the UK should be a safe space where young people can discuss the risks associated with terrorism and challenge extremist ideologies. Who is this for? Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations Coventry University Coventry UK; 2. Interpretations of the Prevent duty 23 4.1.1.